2.5 Conclusion

Key Learning Points

Here are the key learning points for this module:

  1. Recognize how your own cultural biases, values and belief systems may affect your interaction with patients.
  2. Refrain from using family and friends as interpreters, and limit the use of ad-hoc interpreters if possible.
  3. Family members can play important roles, just not that of translator.
  4. Always assure patient confidentiality.
  5. Avoid using complicated medical terminology and long sentences when working with an interpreter.
  6. Tailor communication techniques to meet the additional needs of older immigrants and refugees.
  7. Understand that a person’s ethnic and cultural identity can influence their expression of pain and suffering.
  8. Consider the importance of an individual’s culture, spirituality and lived experiences during end-of-life care.
  9. Understand that each individual’s migration journey and how they respond to trauma is personal. Support the mental health of immigrants and refugees through personalized trauma-informed care.
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Photo Credit MSF Congo

Host Closure Video

Transcript

I hope the key points covered in this module will enhance your cross-cultural communication skills. While it may be challenging at times to communicate with patients through an interpreter or the use of web-based language tools, it is extremely gratifying to establish a true connection during a cross-cultural encounter.


Duration: 18 seconds

Authors

Mariella Ferreyra, Kevin Pottie, Doug Gruner, Ayesha Ratnayake, Omar Ezzat, Kate Merritt

References

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  2. Walker PF, Barnett ED, Stauffer WM, editors. Immigrant medicine. Philadelphia (PA): Saunders Elsevier; 2007.
  3. Wiener, E. S., & Rivera, M. I. (2004). Bridging language barriers: How to work with an interpreter. Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 5(2), 93-101
  4. Pottie K, Ortiz L, tur Kuile A. Preparing for diversity: improving preventive health care for immigrants. Our Diverse Cities, Metropolis 2008 Mar 3.
  5. Weiner et al., Bridging Language Barriers: How to Work with an Interpreter, 2004
  6. Kirmayer LJ, Narasiah L, Munoz M et al. Common mental health problems in immigrants and refugees: general approach in primary care. CMAJ 2010 DOI:10.1503– Available at: http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/collection/canadian_guidelines_for_immigrant_health
  7. Thomas E. Robinson II, PhD, George L. White Jr., PhD, MSPH, and John C. Houchins, MD. Fam Pract Manag. 2006 Sep;13(8):73-78.
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  9. Ben-Shlomo, Y., Mamluk, L., & Redwood, S. (2019). A life-course perspective on migrant health. In Migrant Health A Primary Care Perspective (pp. 77-89). New York, New York: Taylor and Francis Group. doi:https://doi.org/10.1201/9781351017190
  10. Farrington, R. (2019). Migration and mental health. In Migrant Health A Primary Care Perspective(pp. 195-209). New York, New York: Taylor and Francis Group. doi:https://doi.org/10.1201/9781351017190
  11. Purkey E, Patel R, Phillips SP. Trauma-informed care. Better care for everyone. Can Fam Physician 2018;64:170-2 (Eng), 173-5 (Fr)